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Home / Resources / Social Justice / Anti-Racism and Cultural Safety / National Film Board – Indigenous Cinema in the Classroom (Ages 15+)

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National Film Board – Indigenous Cinema in the Classroom (Ages 15+)

These are stories about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, the Highway of Tears, Indigenous rights activism, violence against Indigenous Women, Indigenous stereotypes, racism, marginalized communities, community healing, the Oka Crisis, the Kahnawake tribe, Cree burial traditions, Indigenous pride, reconciliation, healing and recovery, residential schools, Two-Spirited people, salmon fishing rights, the Mi’kmaq people, historical perspective on contemporary Indigenous issues, village life in Puvirnituq, preserving cultures and traditions, suicide, addiction, substance abuse, co-existence of traditions and modernity, police violence, Saskatoon’s infamous “freezing deaths,” Indigenous women leadership, the Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve blockade, legal, land and human-rights issues, historical and contemporary understanding of relationships between Indigenous people and the Canadian government, the role of radio in a small community of Teetl’it Gwich’in, the Oka crisis and the now-infamous stand-off between the Mohawks, the Quebec police and the Canadian Army.

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