Search
Generic filters
Filter by Subject
Literacy
Reading
Writing
Numeracy
Computational Fluency
Number Sense
French Immersion
Educational Technology
ADST
Google
Content Creation
Science
Social Studies
BAA Courses
Course Outlines
Physical and Health Education
Sexual Health
Mental Health
ELL
Indigenous Understandings
Environmental Stewardship
Reporting
MyEdBC
PLC
Collaborative Inquiry
Social Justice
Inclusion
Anti-Racism and Cultural Safety
SOGI
Home / Instruction & Assessment / Literacy / Literacy Planning

Literacy

To share and connect
To question and create
To understand ourselves and others
To have a voice, to leave a trace

Primary Literacy Program in NLPS

In NLPS, a comprehensive primary literacy program is based on a meaningful and joyful literacy-rich  learning environment that encompasses:
Literacy is the ability to understand, critically analyze, and create a variety of forms of communication, including oral, written, visual, digital, and multimedia, in order to accomplish one’s goals.  Therefore, a comprehensive primary literacy program should include the following Language Arts curriculum big ideas
Everyone has a unique story to share.
Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
Recognize the importance of story in personal, family and community identity.
Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.

“The long range goal is that we and our students use literacy as a means to lead satisfying and meaningful lives”.

Questions about teaching, learning, resources or technology?

Contact the Learning Line

Listening to Reading

Description

Listening to reading may look like:

  • Online resources on projector
  • listening centre with recorded books and printed copies of the book
  • Listening centre with online recorded material on iPads or computers
  • Class Read Aloud

Why?

Listening to reading allows students to follow along with words or picture and to listen to a model of a fluent reader. It demonstrates nuances of language such as rhythm or pronunciation. It allows teachers to model reading strategies and to make predictions and connections.

Resources

Independent Writing

Description

Independent writing is a time when children write by themselves, exploring their ideas and practicing the skills necessary to effectively communicate through writing. Using formative assessment gathered during conferring with students, teachers can plan mini-lessons that target specific skills and strategies. Independent writing time is quiet, uninterrupted and has purpose. Children brainstorm, develop ideas and apply learned skills and strategies. During independent writing, the teacher has the opportunity to confer with students and determine writing goals.

Why?

Independent writing allows students to see themselves as writers and communicators of ideas and stories. Through guided support, students gain fluency in brainstorming, recording and revising their ideas. Gaining the skills of an independent writer increases student confidence and love of writing.   

Resources

Independent Reading

Description

Independent reading happens when a student is reading on their own, whether it is with a print resource or something online. As the reading is occuring, students are working through the process of decoding the information to both hear the text read inside their head and to comprehend the meaning of the information. Independent reading is a traditional method for learning used in all educational settings.

Why?

Independent reading is a lifelong skill and serves many functions including personal enjoyment, learning through reading, facilitating discovery of the world around us, and can bring an immense sense of joy. It is a nuanced process that requires the combination of many different processes such as phonological awareness, fluency, and comprehension and, as such, should be practiced for 20-60 minutes every day.

Resources

Oral Language

Description

Oral language is the spoken language used to communicate feelings and ideas. It mainly consists of five components: phonological skills, pragmatics (e.g., social norms), grammar (syntax), morphological skills (e.g., prefixes and suffixes) and vocabulary (semantics).

Why?

A strong foundation in oral language skills will lead to greater success in literacy achievement. Children need many opportunities to learn and practice these components of oral language to help them with mastering the reading process.

Resources

Coming Soon! 

Word Work

Description

Literacy centres provide opportunities to differentiate and work with different groups of students. Each group can have a set of words to work on using a variety of consistent materials. Keeping materials consistent allows the focus to be on the words, not the materials used. Word work can be done through games, manipulatives and/or with other classroom materials.

Why?

An understanding of phonemic awareness, phonics and vocabulary are all important skills when reading and writing. Word Work is a way to teach and practice many of these literacy skills.

Resources