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We all want to be healthy. Path to Wellness explores Indigenous Peoples’ views on health and wellness and the importance to everyone of finding balance for the mind, body, spirit, and emotions. Includes 16 student book copies and 1 teacher’s guide.

Engage students in inquiry about Indigenous cultures, worldviews, and history as we work towards reconciliation in Canada.Take Action for Reconciliation inquiry-based student books focus on Indigenous cultures, languages, and worldviews and include:

  • Indigenous voices and perspectives throughout
  • Contemporary stories and historical truths
  • Examples of actions people have taken to promote reconciliation
  • Quotes by Indigenous leaders and Elders highlighting ideas and/or issues
  • Think About It! section to prompt further inquiry and help students connect to their own lives
  • Learn About It! section offering additional facts and information or questions for students to research
  • Final Project: a call to take action, share your learning, taking a step in reconciliation

We all have connections to the land. We Are the Land explores Indigenous Peoples’ relationships with and connections to the land and the importance of maintaining those ties for all people in Canada. Included are 16 copies of student books and 1 teacher’s guide.

Engage students in inquiry about Indigenous cultures, worldviews, and history as we work towards reconciliation in Canada.Take Action for Reconciliation inquiry-based student books focus on Indigenous cultures, languages, and worldviews and include:

  • Indigenous voices and perspectives throughout
  • Contemporary stories and historical truths
  • Examples of actions people have taken to promote reconciliation
  • Quotes by Indigenous leaders and Elders highlighting ideas and/or issues
  • Think About It! section to prompt further inquiry and help students connect to their own lives
  • Learn About It! section offering additional facts and information or questions for students to research
  • Final Project: a call to take action, share your learning, taking a step in reconciliation

The Aboriginal Lens is a guide for those who work in education and are committed to taking up the “Calls to Action on Education” as stipulated by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. This framework is designed to help educators challenge the current, established systems of belief that support Eurocentric practices that have silenced other ways of knowing and being. The lens focuses our efforts and can be used to examine and assess policies and practices. The framework also works to address the needs of the collective and the community, as well as providing common reference for teachers.

Shared Learnings: Integrating BC Aboriginal Content K-10 focuses on the diversity, depth, and integrity of the cultures of British
Columbia Aboriginal peoples. It is a guide for teachers, developed in recognition of the need for classroommaterials that can help all teachers provide students with knowledge of, and opportunities to share experiences with, BC Aboriginal peoples.

 

These are films for educators and parents wanting to learn more about the lives and histories of Indigenous people. Powerful, political, and profound, these films will initiate and inspire conversations on identity, family, community, and nationhood.

They are stories about the blocking of the international bridge that cuts through the Akwesasne Reserve, protest and blockades, resistance, land rights, human rights, asserting one’s rights, diabetes among Indigenous communities, traditional Indigenous medicine, the medicine wheel, colonization, intergenerational knowledge, the Oka crisis, Mohawk communities of Kahnawake and Kanehsatake standing against the Canadian military and Canadian citizens, Mi’kmaq fishermen, the Attawapiskak housing crisis, the Idle No More movement, the sweat lodge, Indigenous pride and dignity, preservation of culture and language, substance abuse and addiction, foster care, suicide, mental health care, Métis identity, and adoption

These are stories about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, the Highway of Tears, Indigenous rights activism, violence against Indigenous Women, Indigenous stereotypes, racism, marginalized communities, community healing, the Oka Crisis, the Kahnawake tribe, Cree burial traditions, Indigenous pride, reconciliation, healing and recovery, residential schools, Two-Spirited people, salmon fishing rights, the Mi’kmaq people, historical perspective on contemporary Indigenous issues, village life in Puvirnituq, preserving cultures and traditions, suicide, addiction, substance abuse, co-existence of traditions and modernity, police violence, Saskatoon’s infamous “freezing deaths,” Indigenous women leadership, the Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve blockade, legal, land and human-rights issues, historical and contemporary understanding of relationships between Indigenous people and the Canadian government, the role of radio in a small community of Teetl’it Gwich’in, the Oka crisis and the now-infamous stand-off between the Mohawks, the Quebec police and the Canadian Army.

Cette exposition présente des sujets inspirés de l’expérience vécue des Survivants des pensionnats indiens. Ces thèmes peuvent être bouleversants pour certains visiteurs. Pour obtenir plus d’information au sujet de cette exposition, ainsi que sur les faits historiques et les répercussions du régime des pensionnats, consultez notre site Web www.legacyofhope.ca.

 

Image teaching maps included are: the Fiddle, Métis flag, Flower Beadwork, Louis Riel, Michif Language, Red River Cart, Red River Jig (Dance), Sash.

This informative and easy-to-follow guide is organized into sections by grade levels: early learners – grade 4, Grades 5 – 8, and grades 9 – 12 and beyond. Each section includes themes to explore, foundational information, resources, activities based on inquiry and critical thinking and ideas for inspiring change and sharing the message.

This virtual exhibition aims to give voice to the experience of the many Métis children who were forced to attend Indian Residential Schools.

This FNESC resource has been developed in response to desire on the part of teachers for more guidance and information on how to incorporate First Peoples materials into their instruction and assessment practices.

It provides an array of ideas and suggestions that can be applied in whole or in part to incorporate First Peoples content into a K-3 classroom. By following the suggestions provided here and remaining open to respectful dialogue and consultation with members of the local First Peoples communities, teachers will benefit their students and expand their own comfort with this material.

These films for middle school learners touch on various subjects related to the topic of nationhood, including: the search for identity, Atikamekw roots, fatherhood, richness of heritage, celebration of heritage and the power of dancing in a powwow, ignorance, prejudice, racism, empowerment, bullying, discrimination, the Abenaki tribe, loss of home and land, colonization, the Indian Act and Bill C-31, Indigenous stereotypes, Indigenous pride, the Haisla people of British Columbia, the journey of the G’psgolox Pole, Indigenous languages, the Talking Circle, the Potlatch, Indigenous medicine, intergenerational knowledge, present-day environmental issues and concerns, oppression and resistance, conflict resolution, traditional Indigenous dance, hunting and trapping, Pete Standing Alone and the Blood Indians of Southern Alberta (English only), residential schools, preserving the traditional ways of life, and Indigenous elders.

These short films for younger learners are by Indigenous filmmakers from across Canada. These stories address a range of subjects, such as: the influence of elders, realizing your potential, sharing knowledge, discovering history and culture, the power of nature, parent/child relationships, Arctic landscapes and Inuit objects and iconography, first contact, Inuit folklore, the hoop dance, Indigenous traditions, intergenerational knowledge, Mi’kmaq legends, traditional crafts and skills such as sled making and igloo building, music and dance, and seal hunting.