Filter by Subject
Social Emotional Learning
Literacy
Oral Language
Reading
Writing
ELL
Numeracy
Patterning & Linear Relations
Geometry & Measurement
Computational Fluency & Algebra
Number Sense
French
Science
Life Science
Physical Science
Earth Science and Space
Social Studies
Historic Technologies
Economy and Trade
Land (Landforms Place & Natural Resources)
Cultural Practices
Indigenous Understandings
Hul̓q̓umín̓um̓
Hulq Vocabulary Development
Dictionaries, Grammar & Phonemic Guidelines
Bingo and Listening Activities
Reconciliation
BC First People
Coast Salish
Arts
Music & Dance
Visual Art
ADST
Technology Education (Woodwork, Engineering, Robotics, etc)
Home Ec & Culinary Arts (Foods, Textiles, etc)
Information and Communication Technology
Physical and Health Education
Physical and Sexual Health
Mental Health
Environmental Stewardship
Outdoor Education
Social Justice
Inclusion
Anti-Racism and Cultural Safety
SOGI
BAA Courses
Course Outlines
Non-Curricular
Google
Professional Topics & Templates
Collaborative Inquiry
Reporting
MyEdBC
PLC
Home / Resources / Science / Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science, Book 2

Our Resources

Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science, Book 2

Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science, Book 2

Authors: Edited by Gloria Snively and Wanosts'a7 Lorna Williams

Knowing Home attempts to capture the creative vision of Indigenous scientific knowledge and technology that is derived from an ecology of a home place. The traditional wisdom component of Indigenous Science—the values and ways of decision-making—assists humans in their relationship with each other, the land and water, and all of creation. Indigenous perspectives have the potential to give insight and guidance to the kind of environmental ethics and deep understanding that we must gain as we attempt to solve the increasingly complex problems of the 21st century.

Braiding Indigenous Science and Western Science is a metaphor used to establish a particular relationship. Linked by braiding, there is a certain reciprocity. Each strand remains a separate entity, but all strands come together to form the whole. When we braid Indigenous Science with Western Science we acknowledge that both ways of knowing are legitimate forms of knowledge.

The book provides a window into the vast storehouse of innovations and technologies of the Indigenous peoples who live in Northwestern North America. It is our hope that the Indigenous Science examples, research and curriculum models will inspire deep reflection regarding the under-representation of Aboriginal students in the sciences. It is intended that the rich examples and cases, combined with the resources listed in the appendices, will enable teachers and students to explore Indigenous Science examples in the classroom, and in addition, support the development of curriculum projects in home places.

Culturally Appropriate Curriculum Projects Included:

Chapter 7 – Cross-Cultural Marine Science: Culturally Inclusive Curriculum for All Learners
DAVID ASHURST, RICHARD KOOL, AND GLORIA SNIVELY

Chapter 8 – Secondary School Student Researchers Use Digital Video as a Learning Tool for Retaining and Transferring Indigenous Knowledge
MUPENKIN JOHN LYALL AND TED RIECKEN

Chapter 9 – Learning from the Homeland: An Emerging Process for Indigenizing Education
WSÁNEC SCHOOL BOARD AND TYE SWALLOW

Share this resource